Professor Interview: Dr. David Jalovick

Toccoa Falls College is proud to highlight one of its most beloved history professors, Dr. David Jalovick. During the interview, Dr. Jalovick explains how TFC has changed over the years.
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“How long have you been a professor here at TFC, and what classes do you teach?”

“I first came as a professor back in 1997. So this summer will be 20 years of teaching here, but before I became a professor I graduated from Toccoa Falls College in 1981. Right now, I am teaching 11 history courses, which is the bulk of the history courses that the school offers. For a while, I was basically the only history professor here at TFC, but we now have several adjuncts who teach a few of the courses.”

“So, you have been here for a long time. What kinds changes have you experienced over the years?”

“As a student, you are talking about a history that goes back 42 years. I first came onto this campus in 1975. One of the major things that has changed is the increase of students from Georgia. I noticed that when I came back as a professor the Hope grant had been established, which enabled a number of Georgia students to come to this college who would not have attended because of the tuition. One thing that was especially noticeable to me were the number of cars that were not on campus during the weekend. When I was a student, most of us were from out of state, and as a result nobody left, or very few people, left to go home.

Clothing styles have come and gone. When I was here, jeans were not allowed in the classroom because some of us were not wearing the best quality jeans. In regard to hairstyles for the guys, facial hair was not allowed.  There were rules on hair length and dress length for women. Those things have changed.

Also, we have a much larger minority population. Whether African-American or Asian-American, minority population has grown. We are more ethnically and racially diverse than we were when I was a student. ”

“What was your experience like when you were a student at TFC, and what was your favorite part of being a student?”

“I was a missions cross-cultural major, and I have told plenty of people over the years that I think we had the best experience. We were taught to be world Christians, not worldly Christians. We were encouraged to get out of the American evangelical box. I felt that my studies went along with the biblical training that we were learning, as well as the various liberal arts and other courses.

When I first came as a student, I knew no one. I was 800 miles away from my home in Buffalo, New York. It took a while to get to know fellow students.  I am very thankful for the foundation and experiences that I had here. You can benefit from both the good and the bad; both types of experiences shape you, hopefully for the better.”

“Were you here for the dam break? What was it like for you and how did it effect you?”

“I was not in Toccoa at the time of the dam break. After my sophomore year, which ended in the spring of ’77, my fiancée and I decided that it would be better for me to drop out of school temporarily so that we could get married and I could work while she finished her nursing degree. The school that she was attending was in Fayetteville, North Carolina, 300 miles away. We planned to move back to Toccoa after she graduated so that I could finish my degree as well. Though we were not living in Toccoa at the time, we did come back several times to visit before November of 1977. In fact, my wife’s parents were living in the trailer park on campus because her dad was taking classes at the school. We knew a good number of students who were attending TFC at the time of the dam break, and we were here visiting no less than 3 weeks before the tragedy occurred. We came back the day after it happened, but we were not allowed to cross the bridge.  We knew a good number of the folks that had been killed, as well as the families.

One of my good friends, Jerry Brittan, was killed in the basement of Forrest hall. Jerry was from Western New York, and, since he did not have a car, he and I drove my car to New York several times. His room was where the Communications Department is now, and he was not able to make it out the night of the flood. A number of people that my wife’s family knew were killed in the flood as well. Thankfully, my wife’s parents survived the flood. The flood waters actually carried their trailer, rather than crushing it. After the flood, we stayed in Toccoa for a couple of days and visited some folks. It is hard to believe that this fall it will be 40 years ago since it happened.”

Toccoa Falls is thankful to hear from Professor Jalovick on his experience and vision at the school.

 

 

 

 

Battling Defeat During Midterms

It’s here! It’s that time of the year where it becomes progressively harder and harder to persevere. It’s that time of year when professors and parents are giving constant encouragement to “finish strong.” It’s that time of year where assignment after assignment comes due. It’s midterms week.

Before fall break, it is very academically, and emotionally, difficult for students. There is a great deal of pressure and stress involved with finishing final assignments and preparing for the first break of the year. Students lose sleep, and drink more coffee to keep them going. With everything that they have to do, it is easy to give into feeling defeated. It is easy to focus on this one week of academic strain and lose sight of the big picture. God has given each of his children strength for every moment. Anything one could ever need, they already have in Christ. He has given his children enough strength, enough patience, and enough perseverance to overcome anything they may face. With all the anxiety this time of year causes, it is easy to be consumed by defeat. It is difficult for students to juggle the greater amount of responsibilities and obligations given to them. With the high level of stress that accompanies this week, it is even more important to remember to keep one’s eyes set on things above, not on things below. As soon as one is consumed by anxiety, crippling defeat is not far behind.  An anonymous Toccoa Falls College Sophomore wrote a short piece of poetry concerning this week.

 

“Dear defeat,

It’s been a long battle between the two of us. You knock me down, and I’ll recover, then you’ll knock me down again. You haven’t given me a moment’s rest. You’ve come at me with everything you possibly could, but I will not be undone. I am in the palm of the one who crafted the heavens and the earth. You have no power over me. The things you attack me with are temporal. They are ultimately meaningless. You have lost. By the grace of my God and my King, it is YOU who are undone.

Dear defeat, you have been defeated.”

Battling the feeling of defeat is a primary part of spiritual warfare. Once a student stops fighting and succumbs to defeat, it is so much easier to fall into depression and despair. This principle applies not only to midterms week, but in all areas of life. God calls us to “fight the good fight of faith.” We as Christians are to “take hold of the eternal life to which you were called” (1 Timothy 6:12). God has called his people to live courageously and fight with strength and perseverance. This spiritual battle is challenging. After all, if it was easy, God would not have encouraged His people to fight with courage.

It is the midpoint of the semester, fight to finish well! Fall break is in sight, so fight the good fight.

Meet Martha

Hello there!  I’m Martha Mae, and I’m just tickled that you’re here. It isn’t often that I get visitors this far out. But if they do make it out here, nobody leaves with the bout of melancholy they came in with. You see, I just have that special knack for advice givin’. My mama had it, and so did her mama, and well, here I am with the same skills. I always seem to know just what to say to make a soul feel better.

Oh, but there I go, rambling along, but you don’t know nuttin’ about who I really am. I guess the first thing you oughta know is that I moved here from Savannah, GA. I was the prettiest girl in Savannah… Well, at least that’s what daddy said, but then mama would always shoot him a look that let him know she didn’t ‘ppreciate losing the contest. Anywho…

I make the best dang peach tea and pecan pie that will ever grace your taste buds. My pie has won blue ribbon at county fair for the past three years now. My mama and nana have taught me all their household runnin’ secrets. I’ve been married for nearly 50 years now. I’ve worked with people my whole life in different job endeavors, always following dreams. I love to paint and draw overlookin’ my back crick.  I’m just a regular ole southern gal still looking for adventure.

My kids are all grown now trying to give advice to little kiddos of their own. My husband spends his days fishing and cracking some smart aleck jokes in the rocking chair next to me. I’ve got some life under my belt and I want to share it with you, youngins.  It’s time my advice givin’ skills were put to good use.

I say all of that to let you know a little of who I am and why I can help you. All you have to do is ask; I won’t tell nobody your name or who you are. That’ll all be our little secret. So, come and sit a while with me on my porch and I’ll try to help you the best I can with what the Good Lord gave me. I hope we can learn a little from each other.

If you do decide that you would like to contact me to advise you in your time of need, honey, you can reach me by e-mail at: ComeToMartha@gmail.com.

I would love to help you. After all, these grey hairs aren’t just for show. Where else would you find this much knowledge in one place? Come back soon!

A Night of Improv and Comedy

This past Saturday and Sunday, the Toccoa Falls College Theatrical Society put on their spring production,“A Night of Comedy and Improv.”

Like the title of the show suggests, the actors and actresses performed a few short, comedic skits and entertained the crowd with some bits of hilarious improvisation. The small group of students who had committed to this production rehearsed and prepared for months. The resulting performance showed their hard work!

The skits included a two-part sketch called “Flirting Academy”, inspired by Studio C, and a zany skit called “Are you a fool?” directed by TFC Junior, Rachel Mayo.

The Theatrical Society performed a more serious play in addition to the comedies. TFC senior, Rebekah Stillwell, directed “The Lifehouse Everything Skit”. This silent skit portrayed the redemption story in a moving and beautiful way. Stillwell commented on the evening,

“This was one of the most fun performances the Theatrical Society has ever done! I loved the way almost everyone was in multiple acts. And while our scripted skits were awesome, the best parts (and the ones that got the most laughs) were the improv sessions. It made for an informal, more laid back interaction with the audience. It was a very close-knit group and I was so proud to work with them!”

The night was filled with laughter and a good time was had by actors and audience alike. One audience member said, “It was comical and interesting. I can’t compare it to anything else!”

Rebecca Colson, the leader of the improve troupe, Dead Joke Society, shared her parting thoughts about the production,

“I loved getting to hang out, goof off, and get to know the cast members. With all the stress of final assignments, acting with this group of people has been a great boost. And getting to pray for them before and after rehearsals has been a special joy for me as a director.”

 This statement from Rebecca really sums up what the Theatrical Society is about. This group of theatrically inclined students is able to come together, build each other up, and pray for one another. The group loves to have fun together and, through performing together regularly, has developed a strong bond. Their chemistry transcends from their personal lives to the stage, where they can encourage and entertain others through their passion for the Arts. Their goal is to glorify God in the talent they share with the community and the student body, and this goal has been achieved every semester.

The group loves to have fun together and, through performing together regularly, has developed a strong bond. Their chemistry transcends from their personal lives to the stage, where they can encourage and entertain others through their passion for the Arts. Their goal is to glorify God in the talent they share with the community and the student body, and this goal has been achieved every semester.

The Theatrical Society is a great facet in the student life at Toccoa Falls College. They will have more great performances and events next semester, so students can be on the lookout for their updates! For more information about the Theatrical Society contact club president, Callan Bentley at callanbentley@tfc.edu or Rebecca Colson at rebecacolson@tfc.edu.

For more information about the Theatrical Society contact club president, Callan Bentley at callanbentley@tfc.edu or Rebecca Colson at rebecacolson@tfc.edu.

My Journey at TFC: Katelyn Kohoutek

In an interview, Katelyn Kohoutek, a senior from Loganville Georgia, explained how Toccoa Falls College has framed her identity in Christ through educational and spiritual aspects. Having studied all four years at TFC, she shared her journey, as well as her experiences that contributed to her spiritual growth. Katelyn said that TFC has impacted her relationship with Christ as she was nurtured in the Christ-centered community and provided a strong educational background.

One of Toccoa Falls College’s many positives, said Katelyn, was the Northeast Georgia Mountains. Having a love for the mountains and nature, she was glad to find a school that was not too close, yet not too far from her home. Sensing a peace from the Lord, and with TFC offered counseling program, Katelyn was encouraged to find a school that would support her throughout the chapters of her life.

“You can dislike, resent, or even resist change, no matter what… it is inevitable and it’s important to savor relationships, places, passions, and seasons while you have them because the Lord knows what you need for the next one and is faithful in helping you adjust in the change.”

At Toccoa Falls, Katelyn believes that she grew in her faith even when feeling like she could not hear the Lord’s voice. While growing up in the church, Katelyn clarified that she had plenty of heart knowledge, but a lack of biblical knowledge. After she gained a clearer understanding of the Bible, she came to see and explore and see Christ through all things. The most important point Katelyn made is her discovery of Christ, not only in the church, but also through the surrounded non-religious culture.

When asked to give advice to younger students, Katelyn strongly suggested avoiding a narrow-minded point of view. “There is a reason one is in the community God has placed that person”, she continues. Furthermore, she encouraged students to take full advantage of social activities. Katelyn loves TFC because building relationships allowed her to fulfill God’s plan to be in community with one another.

As a senior, her time was spent around people her own age. As she prepares to be thrown into the career world, she realizes the importance of studying different passions. Therefore, her second word of advice is to take classes offered in other majors. Katelyn explained that understanding the perspective of other majors is humbling. Katelyn exclaimed, “Each major has a different flavor in the way it views life.”

After her long-awaited graduation, Katelyn is preparing for her wedding in October. Currently, she and her fiancé plan on expanding and growing the ministry at Camp Grace in North Carolina. As a newlywed, Katelyn wishes to work with teens, build relationships, and aid in the camps needs. Katelyn believes being a student at Toccoa Falls College has prepared her spiritually and intellectually for her future career.